AllThingsThatMatterPress

Publisher of great books in many genres!

          SUBMISSION REQUIREMENTS

 

 

How to Submit

To

ALL THINGS THAT MATTER PRESS

 

NOTE:  WE ACCEPT SUBMISSIONS FROM AUTHORS ONLY

WE DO NOT ACCEPT SUBMISSIONS FROM LITERARY AGENTS

 

 

 

FAILURE TO FOLLOW THESE SIMPLE
 
REQUIREMENTS WILL RESULT IN
 
REJECTION (with no response).
 
 
PLEASE READ THIS SECTION PRIOR TO
 
SUBMITTING YOUR MANUSCRIPT

 

 

1)  We accept manuscripts by email submission only and only from the author (no agents).

 

2)  Please send a summary of your work in an email along with the first three chapters as a

     Word doc attachment (no other formats will be accepted.  Do not send submissions in PDF, Word

     Perfect, Open Office, or any other format.). 

     Please check the Home page for any submission notices that may have been posted.


3) Please type the following in the subject line of your email:  Submission (followed by your

     manuscript title).

 

4) For short story anthologies and poetry submissions please include the entire manuscript as an

    attachment. Poetry must be a minimum of 35,000 words.

 

 

 ***

 

 IMPORTANT

 

PASTE THE FOLLOWING IN YOUR EMAIL SUBMISSION

(if you fail to do so, your submission will not be responded to)

 

 

I have read your website and contract and

understand the content.


 ***

 

 

WE DO NOT ACCEPT CHAP BOOKS.

FULL-LENGTH MANUSCRIPTS ONLY. MINIMUM 45,000 WORDS.

WE DO NOT PUBLISH SINGLE SHORT STORIES; ONLY BOOK LENGTH MANUSCRIPTS ARE CONSIDERED!.

 

WE DO NOT CONSIDER SUBMISSIONS OF WORKS THAT ARE CURRENTLY AVAILABLE IN ANY VENUE OR FORMAT.

 

 ***

 

 

PLEASE READ THE CONTRACT PRIOR TO SUBMISSION;

 

IT IS NOT SUBJECT TO CHANGE

 

***

 

WE WILL NOT RESPOND TO SUBMISSIONS THAT ARE NOT IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE REQUIREMENTS LISTED BELOW

 

PLEASE USE THE FOLLOWING AS A CHECKLIST

 

 

1.      Send submissions by email attachment as a Word document only.

 

2.      On the first page of the manuscript include your name and your email/contact   

       information.  

 

3.      Manuscripts should be in Times Roman 12 pitch, double spaced, with:

 

      -No fancy fonts or page break symbols

 

      -Use *** to indicate scene breaks.

 

      -Do not double space between paragraphs.

     

      -Please do not copy and paste material into a manuscript; doing so creates a  

       document that is incompatible with our typesetting program.

 

4.     If your manuscript contains graphics, describe their nature in the cover email.  All graphics must be black and white. If the manuscript is approved for publication, all graphics must be provided as individual, high resolution (300 dpi minimum) jpegs.  GRAPHICS MUST BE OWNED OUTRIGHT; WE DO NOT ACCEPT LICENSED/COPYRIGHTED GRAPHICS.

 

5.       The manuscript must be completed.  

 

6.    Indicate the word count for the entire manuscript in the email

 

7.   Make sure your book is polished and all of your typos are correctedManuscripts with poor spelling and grammar and/or multiple typographical errors will be rejected.

 

8.   EDIT, EDIT, EDIT!  It is wise to have someone (other than a close friend or relative) edit your book.  If you have not even done a spelling/grammar check, do not submit!

 

9.  Only full-length manuscripts are accepted.

 

10. If your book has been previously published, including self-published, you must advise of same in your query.  If we request the full manuscript for further review, you will need to provide written verification that rights have reverted to you from any prior publisher.  If your book is still available in any format in any venue, please do not submit it to us.

 

11. Author Marketing Plan is required.  There are over 3,000 books published in the United States alone each week. What will you do to rise above the pack?

 

      Please indicate in your submission:

     

     What efforts you plan to market your book. In today's market, the author is pivotal in the success of any marketing strategy. What will you do to promote your  book? What are your plans as an author regarding future books?

      

      What is your platform? What have you done to become known as a writer generally and on your topic/subject matter? Who is your target audience?

 

      What social networks are you active in?

 

       Do you have the time and are you committed to promoting your work?

 

Please send your work to allthingsthatmatterpress@gmail.com. We will acknowledge receipt promptly, and will notify you of our decision in a timely manner.

 

***

 

COMMON GRAMMAR/PUNCTUATION MISTAKES

 


Please refer to the following when you review your manuscript before submission.

 

One space between sentences in fiction; two spaces between sentences in non-fiction.

 

We receive many manuscripts that mis-use the em dash, colon, semi-colon, and ellipsis. Over use of any of these grammar tools disrupts the flow of a book, not to mention that incorrect usage is … well, incorrect! Please read the following. If you over use these tools, then re-edit. In many cases, a simple comma, or creating two sentences out of one, works better.

 The em dash is significantly longer than the en dash and is usually used to separate parts of a sentence in standard English prose. Here are its major specific uses:

   1. An abrupt change in the flow of a sentence where the text description that follows the dash is unexpected or significantly deviates in tone from what came before it

   2. An abrupt termination, such as when a person is speaking and is suddenly interrupted before finishing a sentence

   3. A parenthetical remark — like this — where there is initially an abrupt change but the normal flow of the sentence returns after the second dash Em dash

The em dash (—), or m dash, m-rule, etc., often demarcates a parenthetical thought or some similar interpolation, such as the following from Nicholson Baker's The Mezzanine:

    At that age I once stabbed my best friend, Fred, with a pair of pinking shears in the base of the neck, enraged because he had been given the comprehensive sixty-four-crayon Crayola box — including the gold and silver crayons — and would not let me look closely at the box to see how Crayola had stabilized the built-in crayon sharpener under the tiers of crayons.

It is also used to indicate that a sentence is unfinished because the speaker has been interrupted. For example, the em dash is used in the following way in Joseph Heller's

Catch-22:

     He was Cain, Ulysses, the Flying Dutchman; he was Lot in Sodom, Deirdre of the Sorrows, Sweeney in the nightingales among trees. He was the miracle ingredient Z-147. He was—

    "Crazy!" Clevinger interrupted, shrieking. "That's what you are! Crazy!"

    "—immense. I'm a real, slam-bang, honest-to-goodness, three-fisted humdinger. I'm a bona fide supraman." 

If you’re using em dashes to indicate a trailing off in thought, you’re using them incorrectly.  Also, as with ellipses below, over use of em dashes breaks the flow of your story, and gives editors nightmares.

 

The colon has two uses:

    1. To indicate that what follows it is an explanation or elaboration of what precedes it (the rule being that the more general statement is followed by a more specific one) [There is one challenge above all others: the alleviation of poverty.]

    2. To introduce a list [There are four nations in the United Kindom: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.]

Note: A colon is never preceded by a white space, but it is always followed by a white space, and it is never followed by a hyphen or a dash.

Please don’t use a colon to introduce dialogue!  That’s why keyboards have commas!

 

The semicolon has two similar major uses:

    1. To join two complete sentences into a single written sentence when the two sentences are too closely related to be separated by a full stop and there is no connecting word which would require a comma such as 'and' or 'but' [It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to, than I have ever known.]

    2. To join two complete sentences into a single written sentence where the second sentence begins with a conjunctive adverb such as 'however', 'nevertheless', 'accordingly', 'consequently', or 'instead' [I wanted to make my speech short; however, there was so much to cover.]

 Keep in mind that one does not use a semicolon when there is a connecting word.  This is a common mistake. 

 Note: In the above uses, the semicolon is stronger than a comma but less final than a full stop.

 There is a minor use of the semicolon: to separate items in a list when one or more of those items contains a comma [The speakers included: Tony Blair, the Prime Minister; Gordon Brown, the Chancellor of the Exchequer; and Ruth Kelly, Secretary of State for Education & Skills.]

 

The ellipsis (...), sometimes called the suspension or omission marks, has three uses:

    1. To show that some material has been omitted from a direct quotation [One of Churchill's most famous speeches declaimed: "We shall fight them on the beaches ... We shall never surrender".]

    2.  To indicate suspense [The winner is ...]

    3.  To show that a sentence has been left unfinished because it has simply trailed off [Watch this space ...] The ellipsis indicates an unfinished sentence or thought. The thought or dialogue trails off. Do not overuse the ellipses. There should not be a lot of trailing thoughts in your book. It is not used when a thought is interrupted; that is the em dash.

 In general, treat an ellipsis as a three-letter word, constructed with three periods and two spaces, as shown here.

 In nonfiction writing one uses an ellipsis to indicate the deletion of one or more words in condensing quotes, texts, and documents. One must be especially careful to avoid deletions that would distort the meaning.

 In fiction writing, an ellipsis is usually meant to convey an unfinished thought designed to force the reader to use his/her imagination to discern what might come next. This is easily overdone, however, and can adversely impact the flow of a story. Because of their disruptive power, ellipses must be used very sparingly and only with careful prior consideration. Never resort to ellipses as a crutch or out of laziness.

Put quite succinctly by Deb Taber, Apex Book Company:

… those nasty little spots, the ones that make editors want to scratch their eyes out and scream … Those pesky little dots come in so handy that writers seem to want to toss them onto manuscripts by the handful. Or perhaps it isn’t intentional; they may get sneezed out onto the computer screen by writers allergic to the frustration of being unable to find the perfect transition …Writers, please, for the love of your story, just stop. Take your finger off the period key after just one stroke each and every time … They hurt your credibility as a writer … Do not use ellipses at the end of a scene unless you are absolutely certain that there is a grammatically logical reason for them to be there, such as to indicate the POV character’s mind drifting from the present scene into a flashback that is directly caused by the occurrences in the scene right before the ellipses. Remember, there is nothing wrong with the perfectly serviceable single period….

 

Put even more succinctly by Deb Harris, All Things That Matter Press:

As a general rule, I intensely dislike them, since they are so often over/mis-used.  Rarely, and I do mean rarely, have I encountered an author who understands the proper use of ellipses.  Hence the inordinate amount of attention given to them in these guidelines.  If I could give you one bit of advice, I’d echo Deb Taber’s comments above and add do not use ellipses unless you absolutely have no other alternative.

 

The parenthesis:

Almost never used in novels.  So don’t use them in yours.





 

Super Share

Share on Facebook

Twitter Follow Button

Google +1 Button

Recent Blog Entries

No recent entries